RECENT REVIEWS & ENDORSEMENTS

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    "This book made me very happy and made me want to start protecting more trees. The book reminded me very much of the trees at school that I named Mr. tree and Mrs. tree. I also liked that she had woven humor into the tree's personalities. It's one of those books that even though it has sad parts it doesn't make you truly sad."
    Isabela R. 11 year old ~ Isabela R.

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    A Book of Joy and Enchantment
    Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation is an enchanting book and a joy to read. It will make a perfect gift book for young teens who are tasked with helping to care for a family elder who seems to be lost in the fog of a dementia. Emma's ability to find solace in the oak tree in her garden appears - at first - to be the only way she has to cope with her family's multi-generational turmoil. Little does she know that it is The Doorway into an underworld of mystery and intrigue . Her journey into this strange and fantastical place will prove to help empower her with a strength that can only be delivered to her by the Spirits of her Ancestors and the Trees. I strongly urge readers to buy this book - as well as a second and third copy to share with friends and family. It will bring happiness to anyone who are fortunate enough to read it.
    Author of Symphony of Spirits: Encounters with the Spiritual Dimensions of Alzheimer's ~ Dr. Deborah Forrest, Amazon.com

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    5/5 STARS
    I loved the book,the plot was captivating and engaging. I was hooked into the story from the beginning and it was a one sit read for me. The characters were well developed and the prose beautiful. The book was wonderful and I would recommend it to everyone. ~ Rubina Bashir, Booklove blog

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    A Magical Read for Children and Adults

    Mystical, magical and adventurous certainly describes this charming and important story. Emma Oliver, a 11 year old girl, living in Peachtree City, GA, soon discovers her life purpose, through Annie Oakley, a special oak tree in her backyard – a tree who understands her problems. Annie, and the network of tree spirits, help Emma through her difficulties. This book is written for children; however, it will also be enjoyed by adults. It teaches all of us about the spiritual aspects of nature, trees and song. And, it encourages us to look deeper within our own souls to search for our true callings. Author Susan Elizabeth Hale has written a lovely fictional work, and it should be included in every child’s library! ~ Deborah Lloyd, Amazon

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    I really enjoyed reading this great story. It is written with children in mind but it speaks deeply to me on another level . As an artist who enjoys painting trees I believe trees have a joy that Susan Hale has captured in a beautiful and lively way. Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation is a great read and a perfect gift. ~ Sara Bennett, Facebook

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    This is a great book. for Adults and Children. An adventure worthy of Harry Potter fame. The Author has a vivid imagination. If you love trees and nature this exciting story will encourage you to think more deeply about the trees and what the do for us. Hard to put down. ~ Gillian Cooper, Facebook

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    A fun read with an important message
    This is a playful romp of a fairytale quest, ideal for readers of 9-11 years old, that sets nature against urban development. It should encourage children to defend their natural environment and to be considerate of trees. As such, I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it.
    We get a clear picture of a lonely girl – Emma Oliver. She is new to her town, is bullied and worries she will end up like her senile grandmother. She seeks solace in her favourite tree, Annie Oakley. Any reader who had a childhood affinity for a particular tree will empathise with Emma and want her to overcome her fears and succeed in her quest.
    The story is well plotted, fast paced and full of humour. I loved the eccentric old ladies in hats! The speaking animals made it reminiscent of Alice in Wonderland, and the creative ideas help you to imagine a secret life of trees, invisible to us humans.
    I would class it as plot-led prose rather than literary fiction – I found the -ing verbs a little repetitive – but this doesn't distract from the story at all, and there are some beautiful images. There is plenty of imagination here – I would love to see the book illustrated.
    Harriet Springbett - Author of Tree Magic ~ Harriet Springbett

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    Eleven-year-old Emma doesn't know that she comes from generations of tree singers, passed from mother to daughter. She doesn't believe she can sing. Her ailing grandmother has just come to live with the family. Her father is hardly ever at home. Her mother has been acting strange. To add to Emma's troubles, her mother's great uncle from England is coming to stay. Then, a strange old woman wearing a hat full of feathers appears mysteriously in her garden. She gives Emma a white swan feather that emits a haunting melody. Emma's only solace is the oak tree in her garden, which she names Annie Oakley. What she does not yet know is that Annie is part of a network of tree spirits who disguise themselves as old women. These spirits have come to Peachtree City to help Emma remember her mission to sing the Song of Creation and save the Great Mother tree. An original, compelling, thoroughly entertaining from cover to cover, "Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation" is especially recommended for family, school, and community library Fantasy Fiction collections for young readers ages 7 to 17. It should be noted for personal reading lists that "Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation" is also available in a Kindle format ($5.38).


    ~ Fantasy/Sci Fi Shelf, Midwest Book Review

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    This is an entirely magical book, a modern Alice, about the Love of Trees, the importance of Trees, about Music, about the importance of caring for Nature, and totally in "tune" with the ethos of this time in her story and his story. I had so recently purchased a book by Peter Wohlleben, The Hidden Life of Trees, a book that does in very scientific and loving ways, tell us, about the vast underground network that forms the Family of Trees, a far deeper connectivity than many knew, and this communications network is vast and amazing, in so many ways. Of course Trees for us, should echo through history, as we have our Garden Story, yes, that Tree, the Tree of Life, and then, the Tree of Knowledge. Back to this book, a rollicking adventure story that throws Emma, our heroine, into a fantastical adventure that involves saving the Mother Tree, that is very much about the Music, about the value of trees, this the poetree, of Life Herself, speaking. I love the imaginative flow of this Story, how the weave is spell binding in many ways, and the joy of Nature comes ringing through. I also Love how language, how Emma's name is reverberant with the ancient Mother tree, how that song is so important, for Nature and Nurture come so beautifully together, to keep what is needed green. Maybe beyond belief, be leaf, is such a Story that does entrance. The uses of Enchantment to speak volumes about our need to hug, to honor, and realize the importance for us all, of that leafy sheltering canopy, how Earth herself depends on Trees. ~ Ruth Housman, Amazon.com

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    EMMA OLIVER AND THE SONGOF CREATION
    REVIEW/ ENSDORSEMENT


    Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation is more than a fantasy adventure story for young people. It is a paean to the triumphant power of Nature for all ages. It is particularly a celebration of trees of all shapes and sizes and their subtle, vibrant relationship to humans. Susan Hale tells the story of the eleven year old Emma who, locked within her, has the power through song to rescue and restore the life force of the trees and thus bring about a new creation. Emma has to overcome Esmeralda, representing the force which chokes and saps the trees’ very existence. She has to accomplish what her grandmother and mother failed to do, ensnared as they were by Esmeralda’s constricting powers.

    Hale achieves a completely magical scenario through personifying the trees as human characters that are able to transform themselves into colourful women who can speak. This carries over into squirrels, mice and rabbits that assist Emma in her quest. And the names given to them are humorously precious. This personification is so well done; the interplay of the humans and the trees and animals so homogenous that their distinction disappears. It is a most delightful and scintillating way of storytelling and it has all the essential ingredients of first-rate fantasy – the dialogue between humans and Nature, otherworldly places versus ordinary reality, the struggle of good against evil and magical objects with special powers.

    However, this book is far more than a ripping yarn and a roller coaster ride of thrilling chapters; it is a great parable about humankind’s interrelationship with its environment. For example this is positively symbolized by how Emma treats an oak tree, called Annie Oakley, as a dearest friend whom she speaks to and hugs. This is negatively portrayed as a major theme within the book by the plan of the unnecessary cutting down of trees to make way for a grand hotel. Here Hale appeals to our conscience in the shape of Emma’s father who works for a tree-felling company. Will he, in the face of needed income, carry out the orders of the company’s owner or will he resist such destruction?

    Hale has a natural gift for narrative and the flow of the writing just keeps sailing along through the chapters. The shifting among the scenes from Emma’s home to the protest meeting by the trees transformed into eccentric women, to Esmeralda’s palace, to the site of the potential tree-feeling, to the underground world of the Shining Land and the In-Between is well handled. Despite assuming that it will all end well, this tale is like a thriller, all the more so to a young reader.

    What also characterizes this book is the prominence of the use of vocal sound, something that Hale has promoted in her work as a sound healer and music therapist. She effectively incorporates what might be called “mantras” or incantations and that even includes Emma's name. Some of these incantations take the form of short rhyming poems and are quite charming to recite.

    What is touching and compassionate in her writing is how Esmeralda and Smiley, the tree-felling company owner, are not ultimately punished for their wrongdoing but are redeemed by the sheer loving kindness of the trees themselves.

    In Emma Oliver and The Song Of Creation Hale has managed to stimulate our imagination through superb storytelling while, at the same time, awaken our conscience to the precious , yet often threatened world of trees, our brothers and sisters of Nature. We are exhorted to sing Emma’s song and join her choir.

    I thoroughly enjoyed it ~ James D'Angelo, Author of the Healing Power of the Human Voice

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    I just couldn't put this book down. I read it from cover to cover and two days later I re-read it! Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation is pure fantasy BUT upon my second reading I realised that it is based upon the factual interaction of trees with one another and their relationship with fungi and animals as described in another good book "The Hidden Life of Trees" by Peter Wohlleben, Forester and ecologist. Emma makes the whole subject clear not only to children but to adults with a non-scientific base. I feel that this story would make a superb film to reach those who do not wish to read.

    ~ Paul Cooper, Goodreads

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    They say only the dead can cross a Threshold, the dead and those who have faced a Nemesis Charm. When Apprentice Adventurers, Fletcher and Scoop, discover their mother has fallen under the curse of a strange sickness, they prepare to sail for its source, a Threshold, a doorway to the world beyond the Un-Crossable Boundary. But they are not the only ones seeking to cross the Threshold. Their old enemy, Grizelda, has heard that beyond the Boundary lives a woman with the same power as the Storyteller. With the help of a monster made with an undead heart, she plans to cross the Boundary and steal that power for herself. If she succeeds, the Academy, the island and everything in Fletcher and Scoop's world will be hers.
    Absolutely fantastic read with brilliant characters. I love the drawings too. I loved the ending too. Highly recommended. 5*. I voluntarily reviewed an advanced copy of this book from netgalley. ~ Sue Wallace, Amazon+GoodReads

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    I really enjoyed the story, particularly the main part which is set in a world created by the "Storyteller". There are some very dark elements in this, but also themes about friendship, family and the importance of imagination. I look forward to the next in the series. ~ Margaret Pemberton, Librarian/NetGalley

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    A chapter reader fantasy that encourages children to appreciate trees and the biome they represent.Children who enjoy fantasy with animals and an element of mystery should be satisfied. Emma is a strong, caring character.
    ~ Marielle Kaifer, NetGalley

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    This magical fantasy finds it's way into your heart so easily. It's one of those books to curl up with that makes you turn the pages to see what happens next, yet you don't want the story to end. Alongside the human characters, some good, others concerned only with themselves, we have trees and animals that speak, each in their own unique voice, to weave a strong message about looking after our planet. There is humour and plenty of dramatic twists and turns. Emma's uncle Alf is a treasure who not only brings wisdom to the immediate dilemmas faced by Emma and her family, but plays an important role in encouraging and preparing his niece to take on the difficult path she is destined for. Through her greatest friend and confidante, who happens to be an oak tree called Annie, Emma learns what she must do and the challenges she will have to confront.

    By Susanna Bearfoot, Composer and Music Educator ~ Susanna Bearfoot

  • Emma Oliver and the Song of Creation
    Susan Elizabeth Hale
    Emma and the Song of Creation: A Review


    “Who sings the songs alive in every leaf?”

    Susan Hale, the author of Emma and the Song of Creation clearly does. And in her book, she invites young readers to join her.

    “Who listens to the sonnets of budding blossoms?”

    Emma, the protagonist of Hale's children novel, does. At least, she intuits snatches of their poetry via her lone source of comfort and only friend – a tree in her back yard.

    Through various mysterious and magical experiences, Emma learns that her tree, its kith and kin, the entire natural world, and every marginalized human being are important, connected – and in grave danger. All are losing the struggle to survive the onslaught of modern civilization’s moneyed interests. Emma knows that this is wrong, but she bows to the powerful social pressures that value apathy over action. To confront the social ills head-on, Emma would need a strong heart, to find her voice, and to unleash her song. A tall order for a fearful, lonely, bullied eleven-year old from an unhappy home.

    As the author, a music therapist, leads readers through Emma’s transformation from downtrodden victim to heroic activist in this engaging cautionary tale, youngsters learn how to use their voices in support of beauty, compassion, and truth.

    Will the next generation heed Hale’s call for a more loving world in time to save it? While the central plot of the real-life modern drama has yet to be resolved, by the end of Hale’s masterful composition, youngsters will have the wherewithal to ensure that the human story doesn’t end. Here’s hoping they’ll join Hale’s choir.
    --
    Dr. Linda Sonna is a psychologist and the author of ten parenting books.
    ~ Dr. Linda Sonna

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    Hogwarts meets Earthsea, perhaps? But unique worlds of its own and hugely imaginative writing. I needed to pause every now and then just to enjoy and ponder references and mysteries. A great story, and interesting, sometimes ambiguous characters. Hurry up with part 3, Daniel I-B. ~ Amazon Customer, Amazon

  • May's Moon
    S.Y. Palmer

    May's Moon

    S.Y. Palmer (Our Street Books £6.99)

    Michael May is selected to take part in the Children's Moon Programme in Florida. Ten children from around the world have been chosen, but only three will make the flight to the moon. During the gruelling course and selection procedure several unexplained accidents occur and although this makes Michael frightened, he is determined to find out what is going in.

    May's Moon is an exciting read that will keep boys and girls engrossed. Michael is an admirable character and we wonder if his hard work and honesty will pay off in the end. The detailed account of astronaut training will thrill youngsters who aspire to be the next Tim Peake. Sue Palmer is available for workshops (years 4-7) and can be contacted on her website sypalmer.com. ~ Mary , Chapter One Bookshop, Woodley, Berks.

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    I was given a copy of The Nemesis Charm by Net Galley in Exchange for an honest review. I absolutely loved this book and not since the Harry Potter series have i enjoyed a series this much. This is the second book in The Firebird Chronicles series and it was just as exciting as the first. There's magic and danger. It features all the same characters from the first book.A wonderful story the reader can get completely lost in. I'm looking forward to the next book in the series. ~ Judith Taylor, NetGalley/Amazon

  • Firebird Chronicles, The
    Daniel Ingram-Brown
    The synopsis

    Fletcher and Scoop, apprentice adventurers, discover their mother has fallen under a sickness curse. They set sail to find out its source, the Threshold, a doorway to an uncrossable world. They race against time and their enemy Grizelda, who also seeks the power to cross the Threshold so she too can possess the power of the Storyteller. Will our heroes make it? Will they save their mother and their academy? Read the book to find out!

    The review

    This unique young adult fantasy book is packed full of adventure. The book is ya but can definitely read as middle grade. There are a lot of cool parallels with the use of grammar. (i.e blotting academy, and hosting the grammar games) There is a very unique map at the beginning of the book as well. Although while being book two in the series it can be read as a stand alone but it does have some references to book one. Thrown in some adventure, a dash of suspense and a sprinkle of humor and you have The Nemesis Charm. The plot sets up nicely and unfolds to a good set up for book 3. The characters are well developed and you have a fun time reading this book and immersing yourself in the adventures. 4 out of 5 stars from me! I received this book from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.

    You can buy this book from: ~ Laura Wolf, https://thereadingwolf.wordpress.com/2016/06/24/the-nemesis-charm-by-daniel-ingram-brown-book-review/

AUTHORS YOU MIGHT LIKE
  • Marneta ViegasMarneta ViegasMarneta Viegas is founder of Relax Kids Ltd - the UK's leading expert on children's relaxation. She ...
  • Alan and Linda ParryAlan and Linda ParryAlan studied in London at Hornsey and Willesdon Art Schools where he took his degree. He worked i...
  • Mick InkpenMick InkpenNick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen are amongst the successful writers and illustrators of childrens' b...
  • Nick ButterworthNick ButterworthNick Butterworth and Mick Inkpen are amongst the successful writers and illustrators of childrens' b...
  • Tiffany PoirierTiffany PoirierTiffany Poirier lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, where she shares her passion for philosophy as...
  • Andy RobbAndy RobbAndy Robb is a committed evangelical Christian, whose two children have taught him how to express hi...
  • Daniel Ingram-BrownDaniel Ingram-BrownBorn in East London, Daniel now lives in Yorkshire, in a house built from the stones of a ruined cas...
  • Paul HarbridgePaul HarbridgePaul Harbridge is a speech-language pathologist who works with adults with developmental disabilitie...
  • Paul SymondsPaul SymondsPaul Symonds has spent the last fifteen years writing about the Bible in one way or another, perform...
  • Dawattie BasdeoDawattie BasdeoDawattie Basdeo children's yoga teacher and founder of Holistic World Ltd, is a passionate promoter ...
  • Angela CutlerAngela Cutler
  • S.Y. PalmerS.Y. PalmerSue Palmer studied German and International Studies at the University of Warwick, before taking up a...
  • M.E. HolleyM.E. HolleyM.E. Holley studied English and Old English at Aberdeen University, becoming fascinated by old legen...
  • Susan HollidaySusan HollidaySusan Skinner is an author, artist and ecumenical Christian living in the south of England.She belon...
  • Helen LawsonHelen LawsonHelen has always written. When working on an American Summer Camp in summer '92 she wrote a poem at ...
POPULAR TOPICS